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King-Nash House 
(Patrick J. King House)
3234 W. Washington Blvd.
1901, George W. Maher
An interesting counterpoint to Maher’s smooth, finely finished, Roman brick and stucco houses is the occasional appearance of a megalithic work. The influence is Richardsonian in this husky limestone city house, with its exquisitely carved columns, capitals, and urns. The rhythmically recurring motif is the thistle, seen in the capitals and dormer and used extensively inside. The monochromatic palette originally offset jewel-like glass mosaic panels, fragments of which remain beneath the second-floor window. Elongated Roman tray shapes, a favorite Maher motif, form the tall fence. Patrick Nash, a later owner, was a prominent politician.

King-Nash House

(Patrick J. King House)

3234 W. Washington Blvd.

1901, George W. Maher

An interesting counterpoint to Maher’s smooth, finely finished, Roman brick and stucco houses is the occasional appearance of a megalithic work. The influence is Richardsonian in this husky limestone city house, with its exquisitely carved columns, capitals, and urns. The rhythmically recurring motif is the thistle, seen in the capitals and dormer and used extensively inside. The monochromatic palette originally offset jewel-like glass mosaic panels, fragments of which remain beneath the second-floor window. Elongated Roman tray shapes, a favorite Maher motif, form the tall fence. Patrick Nash, a later owner, was a prominent politician.


Chicago Center for Green Technology 
(Sacramento Stone Co.)
445 N. Sacramento Blvd.
2002, Farr Assocs.
A small abandoned factory on a former brownfields site was transformed into a showcase for energy efficiency. Photovoltaic panels are on the roof and in the place of awnings. The barrels on the front of the building catch the rain for reuse on the landscape. High-performance insulation, as well as HVAC using ground source heat technology, and a rooftop planted with sun- and drought-tolerant greenery all help the building achieve its LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum rating, the first building in the Midwest and the third in the world to earn such a rating. 
 Image courtesy City of Chicago

Chicago Center for Green Technology

(Sacramento Stone Co.)

445 N. Sacramento Blvd.

2002, Farr Assocs.

A small abandoned factory on a former brownfields site was transformed into a showcase for energy efficiency. Photovoltaic panels are on the roof and in the place of awnings. The barrels on the front of the building catch the rain for reuse on the landscape. High-performance insulation, as well as HVAC using ground source heat technology, and a rooftop planted with sun- and drought-tolerant greenery all help the building achieve its LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum rating, the first building in the Midwest and the third in the world to earn such a rating.

 Image courtesy City of Chicago


Tower House
1306 N. Cleveland St.
2001, Frederick Phillips & Assocs.
This modern urban “tree house” has two floors of interior space sandwiched between a roof terrace and an open carport. Much is achieved with a small building footprint. An exterior circular stair provides code-required redundancy to the concrete block stair tower. The living spaces are on the third floor in order to take advantage of the best views.
Photo via John P. Twigg, Pinterest

Tower House

1306 N. Cleveland St.

2001, Frederick Phillips & Assocs.

This modern urban “tree house” has two floors of interior space sandwiched between a roof terrace and an open carport. Much is achieved with a small building footprint. An exterior circular stair provides code-required redundancy to the concrete block stair tower. The living spaces are on the third floor in order to take advantage of the best views.

Photo via John P. Twigg, Pinterest


John D. Runge House
2138 W. Pierce Ave.
1884, Frommann & Jebsen
The elaborate two-story porch beautifully frames the views through robust posts and finely worked motifs, such as the Masonic insignias under the eaves of the gabled dormer.

John D. Runge House

2138 W. Pierce Ave.

1884, Frommann & Jebsen

The elaborate two-story porch beautifully frames the views through robust posts and finely worked motifs, such as the Masonic insignias under the eaves of the gabled dormer.


Lake View Presbyterian Church
716 W. Addison St.
1888, Burnham & Root
2005, Restoration, Holabird & Root
This simple Shingle Style structure—now gloriously restored—has a high pitched roof and octagonal tower with conical steeple. Built shortly before the annexation of Lake View, it features the wood frame construction that had been prohibited in Chicago after the Fire. In the 1890s the church was enlarged, shifting the axis to north–south.

Lake View Presbyterian Church

716 W. Addison St.

1888, Burnham & Root

2005, Restoration, Holabird & Root

This simple Shingle Style structure—now gloriously restored—has a high pitched roof and octagonal tower with conical steeple. Built shortly before the annexation of Lake View, it features the wood frame construction that had been prohibited in Chicago after the Fire. In the 1890s the church was enlarged, shifting the axis to north–south.