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Chicago Loop Synagogue
16 N. Clark St.
1957, Loebl, Schlossman & Bennett
This congregation began in a hotel room where travelers and businessmen could assemble a daily minyan. The building now serves that function in a ground-level chapel and an upper sanctuary. Reached by a ramp, the sanctuary is dominated by an eastern wall of Abraham Rattner’s stained glass, Let There Be Light.
Photo by Neal Jennings, via Creative Commons, FLICKR

Chicago Loop Synagogue

16 N. Clark St.

1957, Loebl, Schlossman & Bennett

This congregation began in a hotel room where travelers and businessmen could assemble
a daily minyan. The building now serves that function in a ground-level chapel and an upper sanctuary. Reached by a ramp, the sanctuary is dominated by an eastern wall of Abraham Rattner’s stained glass, Let There Be Light.

Photo by Neal Jennings, via Creative Commons, FLICKR


James J. O’Leary House
726 W. Garfield Blvd.
1901, Zachary T. Davis 
O’Leary, whose mother owned Chicago’s most famous cow, was a gambling king who operated from his saloon across from the Stock Yards. His busy, châteauesque house has Renaissance details such as the dormers and balustrades.

James J. O’Leary House

726 W. Garfield Blvd.

1901, Zachary T. Davis

O’Leary, whose mother owned Chicago’s most famous cow, was a gambling king who operated from his saloon across from the Stock Yards. His busy, châteauesque house has Renaissance details such as the dormers and balustrades.


Frederick Beeson House 
5810 W. Midway Park
1892, Frederick R. Schock
Manneristic excesses abound in this Queen Anne house—from the wooden “keystone” piercing the Palladian window form, to the cartoonish broken pediments atop the second-floor bay windows, to the stable’s peculiar gable. The lavish budget was a step up from Beeson’s modest Schock-designed first house in South Austin, and it paid for the stone and leaded colored glass, as well as interior finishes such as African mahogany and walnut.

Frederick Beeson House

5810 W. Midway Park

1892, Frederick R. Schock

Manneristic excesses abound in this Queen Anne house—from the wooden “keystone” piercing the Palladian window form, to the cartoonish broken pediments atop the second-floor bay windows, to the stable’s peculiar gable. The lavish budget was a step up from Beeson’s modest Schock-designed first house in South Austin, and it paid for the stone and leaded colored glass, as well as interior finishes such as African mahogany and walnut.

Episcopal Cathedral of St. James
65 E. Huron St.
1857, Edward J. Burling
1875, Rebuilding, Burling & Adler
1913, Chapel of St. Andrew, Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue
1928, Memorial Narthex, Goodhue Assocs.
1985, Restoration, Holabird & Root
The stenciled nave, a chorus of color, is one of the nation’s finest Victorian interiors. It was designed in 1888 by Edward Neville Stent, a student of William Morris. The church tower still bears the scars of the Great Fire.
Image via Gerald Farinas at en.wikipedia, Wikimedia Commons

Episcopal Cathedral of St. James

65 E. Huron St.

1857, Edward J. Burling

1875, Rebuilding, Burling & Adler

1913, Chapel of St. Andrew, Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue

1928, Memorial Narthex, Goodhue Assocs.

1985, Restoration, Holabird & Root

The stenciled nave, a chorus of color, is one of the nation’s finest Victorian interiors. It was designed in 1888 by Edward Neville Stent, a student of William Morris. The church tower still bears the scars of the Great Fire.

Image via Gerald Farinas at en.wikipedia, Wikimedia Commons


Archstone Apartments
675 W. Lake St.
1987, Nagle, Hartray & Assocs.
This handsome, modern interpretation of the Prairie School idiom privatizes as much open space as possible, creating a tranquil spot that turns its back on the noise of Lake St. and the train tracks. Careful massing and choice of materials visually diminish the bulk. The lobby continues the look, featuring a fireplace with inglenook and Prairie Style light fixtures and leaded glass.

Archstone Apartments

675 W. Lake St.

1987, Nagle, Hartray & Assocs.

This handsome, modern interpretation of the Prairie School idiom privatizes as much open space as possible, creating a tranquil spot that turns its back on the noise of Lake St. and the train tracks. Careful massing and choice of materials visually diminish the bulk. The lobby continues the look, featuring a fireplace with inglenook and Prairie Style light fixtures and leaded glass.