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Thalia Hall
 1807 S. Allport St. 
1893, Faber & Pagels
This husky Romanesque mixed-use building served Pilsen’s Bohemian community as a social and political center and hosted musical and theatrical productions. Apartments and stores helped support the Hall, named for the Greek muse of comedy. Above the entry hovers a “green man,” with hair, beard, and mustache of acanthus. A popular pagan figure co-opted by Christians, he can be traced to the head-hunting and -worshiping Celts. He enjoyed  a revival on turn-of-the-century buildings, particularly those faced with limestone, along with other elements borrowed from the Romanesque.    
Photo courtesy Debbie/Mercer52, via FLICKR, Creative Commons

Thalia Hall

1807 S. Allport St.

1893, Faber & Pagels

This husky Romanesque mixed-use building served Pilsen’s Bohemian community as a social and political center and hosted musical and theatrical productions. Apartments and stores helped support the Hall, named for the Greek muse of comedy. Above the entry hovers a “green man,” with hair, beard, and mustache of acanthus. A popular pagan figure co-opted by Christians, he can be traced to the head-hunting and -worshiping Celts. He enjoyed  a revival on turn-of-the-century buildings, particularly those faced with limestone, along with other elements borrowed from the Romanesque.    

Photo courtesy Debbie/Mercer52, via FLICKR, Creative Commons

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